Griessnockerlsuppe

Another favorite Austrian recipe of mine is Griessnockerlsuppe, which means semolina dumpling soup. I’ve tried this recipe several times now and tweaked it to being just right. It only takes about 15 minutes to make and serves 4. Enjoy:

Dumplings (12):

  • 1 cup + 2 tbsp semolina flour (Coarse is better, but anything works, really.)
  • 1 whole egg
  • 1 egg white
  • 6 tbsp. soft butter
  • 1/4 tsp salt
  • 1/8 tsp nutmeg

Broth:

  • 2 cans or 16 oz. beef broth (chicken works great, too!)
  • 1 small/medium carrot
  • 4 green onions
  • 1 tsp parsley

Making it happen:

Chop carrot into thin slices, and to the same to the green onions. Add vegetables and parsley to broth and start cooking on high.

While that works up to a boil, grab a bowl and whisk the butter until soft and creamy. Add the salt and nutmeg, then add the eggs one at a time. Whip it up so the mix is nice and airy.

Slowly add the semolina flour until all semolina is mixed with egg mixture. (Note: The dumplings are even better when the mix is allowed to chill for 30 minutes in the refrigerator, but if you’re going for a quick meal you can skip that.)

Scoop out small dumplings with a soup spoon and form 12 egg-shaped dumplings. When they’re formed, use a spoon to drop them into your broth. Reduce heat and let simmer for 3-5 minutes (10 if you refrigerated them). Dumplings are done when they float to the top.

Serve the broth with 2 or 3 dumplings per person. Garnish with a pinch of parsley or chopped chives.

Käsespätzle Recipe

Käsespätzle (or homemade egg noodles with cheese) is one of my all-time favorite Austrian/German recipes, and one of my favorites to make. Here’s my recipe!

You’ll want to start the caramelized onion topping first, as it takes the longest.

Caramelized Onions

  • 1 tbsp butter (not margarine)
  • 2 Onions (preferably sweet like Walla Walla, but others work fine too)
  • 1/4 tsp salt

Melt butter in skillet over med-high heat. Stir in sliced onions until they’re covered, then cook for 10 minutes. Stir every 3 mins or so.

Then sprinkle the salt over them (and a tsp of brown sugar if you have tangier onions) and reduce heat to med-low. Cook for 30-40 minutes until they are golden brown and a little crispy looking.

Spaetzle

While the onions are going, grab a large bowl and this stuff:

  • 4 large eggs
  • 2 cups all purpose flour
  • 1 1/2 tsp salt
  • 1/4 tsp pepper
  • 1/4 cup milk
  • At least 2 cups of your favorite cheese(s), grated

Start a pot of water boiling. I use an average-sized sauce pot filled just over 3/4 full, and with a little salt. Add a little butter or oil to the water (to keep the noodles from sticking together)

Beat the eggs soundly, then add the milk, then add all the remaining ingredients except the cheese. Mix the batter well. It will be thick. Set your spätzle hobel or a colander on top of the pot, and scrape about 1/4 of the batter in. Spread the batter across the hobel or colander with a spatula so it falls out the bottom in little bits. When the bits rise to the top, they’re done. It won’t take long. Scoop them out into a bowl or casserole dish with a slotted spoon and repeat until your batter is gone.

Once your spätzle are done, dial your oven to 350°, then layer the spätzle in a casserole dish with your cheese. I usually do 2-4 layers, ending with cheese on top. My favorite spätzle cheeses are Gouda, Appenzeller, and Gruyère, but you can get excellent results with Cheddar and Colby Jack as well.

Bake the spätzle for about 15 minutes. The point is simply to get the cheese and noddles melted together and make the top a little toasty. You can bake it longer for a crispier top if you’d like. When it’s done, serve with the caramelized onions on top.

Bon Appétit! Or as the Austrians say: Mahlzeit!

Image from Foolforfood.de

What IS Awesome Toast?

A lot of people ask me, “Your domain is AwesomeToast… but what does that mean?”

This is often a very difficult question to answer, as the definition of awesome toast is complex and varied — only some of which actually relate to toast as it is commonly understood. That said, I believe the following video begins to scratch the surface and gives an effective (and mouth-watering) demonstration of the fundamentals of awesome toast. Watch as chef Daniel Humm creates the grilled cheese sandwich of the gods:

[YouTube via Gizmodo via Feast]

Ripped-off!

Oooh! This has us mildly steamed:

http://indylaw.indiana.edu/programs/simulation/info.htm

So they totally ripped-off our annual counter-terrorism simulation. No big deal. Frankly, IndyLaw, we’re flattered. Even if you pretty much copied us on everything from your fake CNN site right down to what you named your live video feed.

But hey, it’s cool—until you allude that yours might be the first counter-terrorism simulation of its kind.

Not cool, IndyLaw. Not cool.

In any case, the real first-of-its-kind simulation (started in 2007) is coming again in 2010, and it’s going to be excellent.

And here’s a little documentary about it: